Dr. Joel Schlessinger shares the truth about sunscreen myths

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

Dr. Joel Schlessinger shares the truth about sunscreen myths

When it comes to proper skin care, many people know sunscreen is an essential. However, with myths and other false information floating around, there are still consumers who may not understand the full story on the ways of sun protection. As a board-certified dermatologist, Dr. Joel Schlessinger always wants people to know the truth.

Myths about tanning, skin cancer and UV damage can lead to harmful sun exposure, Dr. Joel Schlessinger explains.

When looking for a sunscreen, many consumers only look at the SPF, which is not the best way to determine if your sunscreen is adequate. SPF only explains how well a product protects against UVB rays, not UVA. Both types of UV exposure cause skin cancer so you need a product that is designated as broad spectrum such as EltaMD UV Clear SPF 46 Broad Spectrum Sunscreen.

Two common misconceptions include the belief that having a darker skin tone or getting a “base tan” will protect you from sun damage. This is untrue as a base tan is only good for about an SPF of 4!  People with dark skin tones are still at risk for skin cancer and need to protect themselves with sunscreen. Additionally, tanning isn’t safer than burning as any change in skin tone indicates UV damage.

Many individuals also believe the sun’s rays can’t penetrate through clouds, windows, umbrellas and other objects. Sunscreen is still essential when the sky is overcast, while you’re under a beach umbrella or spending your day at the office. Sun damage can reach through clouds and windows. Additionally, the sun’s rays can reflect off of sand or snow.

It’s important to know the truth behind sunscreen myths, says Dr. Joel Schlessinger.

There have been several debates about the safety of chemical ingredients in sunscreen, leading people to believe these products can cause allergic reactions or harm the skin. With physical, mineral and chemical formulas to choose from, however, it’s easy for everyone to find a sunscreen that works for their skin type.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger and other dermatologists recommend applying a sunscreen with a minimum of SPF 30 and reapplying every two hours. However, sunscreen is only half of the equation. For optimal sun protection, avoid excessive sun exposure between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. when the sun is most intense. It’s also important to protect your skin with proper clothing such as loose-fitting long sleeve shirts and pants, as well as wide-brimmed hats. Heliocare Sun Protection Pills are daily supplements that can provide added UV protection. Read more sun safety tips from Dr. Joel Schlessinger here.

Do you have questions about sunscreen for Dr. Joel Schlessinger? Share with us in the comments.

Joel Schlessinger MD shares hygiene tips for airplane passengers

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

Joel Schlessinger MD shares hygiene tips for airplane passengersResearchers from Auburn University recently conducted a study to test airplane cabins for two common bacteria. What they found wasn’t good news. The researchers recreated the standard conditions of an airplane cabin, painting MRSA and E. coli bacteria on seat pockets, tray tables, armrests, window shades and other surfaces. The study found E. coli survived for four days on an armrest while MSRA remained on a seat pocket for a week.

It’s important to keep your health in mind while flying, Joel Schlessinger MD says.

Joel Schlessinger MD says frequent fliers should avoid touching airplane surfaces unless absolutely necessary.

“I tell all my patients to avoid contact with seats and really ANY surface on an airplane, if possible,” he says. “The quaint thought that there is a cleaning crew that comes in and methodically cleans every plane during layovers and at the end of the day is preposterous. We all know that it never happens.”

Between tight schedules, delays, loading and unloading, flight crews rarely have time to clean every surface before passengers have to board the plane.

“For that reason, I try not to touch anything while I am on a plane that I don’t have to and wash my hands immediately after I am off the plane,” Joel Schlessinger MD says. “Additionally, I bring CLn cleanser with me when I travel as that fights staph and other organisms.”

Joel Schlessinger MD suggests cleansing with CLn products to avoid the spreading of bacteria.

With antibiotic-resistant bacteria growing stronger than ever, it’s important to practice good hygiene to prevent MRSA from spreading. Bleach is a natural antibacterial that eliminates germs and bacteria without the worsening of antibiotic resistance.

CLn, which contains bleach, is one of the few antibacterial agents that doesn’t lead to the worsening of our antibiotic crisis in America,” Joel Schlessinger MD says.

These cleansers are especially beneficial for athletes and anyone prone to staph infection, eczema, acne or rosacea.

Do you have a question for Joel Schlessinger MD? Share with us in the comment section.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger recommends CLn products to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

Dr. Joel Schlessinger recommends CLn products to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria A recent study suggests antibiotic-resistant bacteria are commonly found on household surfaces. The “superbug,” known as MRSA, has been a problem in hospitals and nursing homes for a long time. Recent findings suggest these bacteria, which are resistant to antibiotics including penicillin, have also started cropping up in residential homes.

MRSA’s antibiotic resistance poses a problem for the industry, Dr. Joel Schlessinger explains.

MRSA bacteria can cause life-threatening skin infections as well as severe conditions like pneumonia and bloodstream infections. Spread through skin contact or sharing supplies like towels, this bug was often thought to be more of a threat to athletes and people living in close quarters such as military barracks or prisons.

Many professionals like Dr. Joel Schlessinger believe this superbug has spread throughout the population because of antibiotic misuse. When bacteria are exposed to an antibiotic but survive, they can quickly become resistant to that drug.

“The problem is that many soaps actually contain antibiotics, which can lead to bacterial resistance,” Dr. Joel Schlessinger says.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger says proper hygiene can help prevent the spread of MRSA.

The best way to help prevent the spread of MRSA is to practice good hygiene around those who have come in contact with the bacteria. Use bleach to clean surfaces they have touched. Bleach is a natural antibacterial that eliminates germs and bacteria without the worsening of antibiotic resistance. It’s also a good idea to wash the person’s bedding and clothes in warm water.

To keep your skin clean, Dr. Joel Schlessinger suggests cleansing with CLn products.

“CLn, which contains bleach, is one of the few antibacterial agents that doesn’t lead to the worsening of our antibiotic crisis in America,” he says.

Do you have a question for Dr. Joel Schlessinger? Share with us in the comments.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger weighs in on a recent study that suggests Botox could improve your mood

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Dr. Joel Schlessinger weighs in on a recent study that suggests Botox could improve your mood                                                                                                                                                               A new study out of Georgetown Medical School suggests that it might be possible to treat depression by relaxing a patient’s facial muscles with Botox. This injectable contracts the muscles, preventing patients from frowning. The research, which will be published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, followed 74 patients with major depression who were assigned either Botox or a saline placebo. Six weeks later, 52 percent of the subjects who were given Botox showed relief from depression, compared with only 15 percent of those who were given the placebo.

Similar studies have found Botox to have the same effects, Dr. Joel Schlessinger explains.

The results of this study are not entirely unprecedented. A study at Cardiff University found that non-depressed patients at a cosmetic dermatology clinic who received a Botox injection above the eyes frowned less and felt better than those who did not receive Botox. A similar study at the University of Basel found that Botox had a more positive effect than a placebo when given to depressed patients. Further research on the effects of Botox will be able to shed more light on this issue.

Other treatments for depression use similar facial feedback, Dr. Joel Schlessinger shares.

It’s still unclear whether Botox is an effective anti-depressant, but there are a few treatments for depression that use facial feedback in a similar way. Light therapy stimulates the retina, exciting the optic nerve and sending signals directly to the brain. This technique is used to treat seasonal depression. Another method includes direct electrical stimulation of the brain’s vagal nerve, which is thought to have anti-depressant effects.

Do you have a question for Dr. Joel Schlessinger? Share with us in the comments.

Joel Schlessinger MD answers frequently asked questions about sun damage

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Sunburned skin is not the only sign of sun damage. Contrary to popular belief, there is no such thing as a “safe” tan. Any change in the color of your skin is a sign of sun damage. In his most recent presentation, Joel Schlessinger MD discusses how to recognize sun damage, the best way to protect yourself and what you can do to reverse existing damage.

Sun damage can cause premature signs of aging and skin cancer, Joel Schlessinger MD explains.

Dark spots, fine lines and wrinkles are a common sign of sun damage. UV exposure creates an uneven skin tone and breaks down elastin in the skin, which gives the complexion a saggy and aged appearance.

Most skin cancer is caused by too much UV exposure. In the early stages, it usually resembles a freckle or a mole that can change in size, shape or color. The best way to avoid skin cancer is through regular visits to your dermatologist. This will also improve your chances of catching it early when it’s easily treatable.

Joel Schlessinger shares tips on how to prevent sun damage.

The best way to prevent sun damage is to avoid direct sun exposure and keep your skin well protected. Apply a daily sunscreen like EltaMD UV Clear SPF 46 Broad-Spectrum Sunscreen and avoid outside activities during peak hours when the sun is directly overhead.

Heliocare Sun Protection Pills can give your regular sunscreen a boost. These daily supplements build up your body’s natural defense against UV damage. Wearing a hat and clothing with SPF also help shield your skin.

Joel Schlessinger MD suggests treating existing sun damage with an anti-aging formula like SkinMedica TNS Essential Serum. This serum combines growth factors, peptides and antioxidants to diminish the look of dark spots and wrinkles.

Do you have a question for Joel Schlessinger MD? Share with us in the comments.

 

Dr. Joel Schlessinger discusses study that found indoor tanning causes more cancer than smoking

Friday, February 7th, 2014

Dr. Joel Schlessinger discusses the study that found indoor tanning causes more cancer than smoking It’s no secret that indoor tanning is dangerous. To see just how harmful tanning beds can be, researchers recently compared prolonged UV exposure with other negative habits. The study results suggest that indoor tanning may result in more cases of cancer than smoking alone.

Tanning beds are often linked to skin cancer, Dr. Joel Schlessinger explains.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger strongly urges his patients to avoid indoor tanning. The UV lamps in tanning beds give off 10 to 15 times more radiation than the sun, which puts users at an even higher risk of developing melanoma.

The study included research that showed how common indoor tanning is among adults and teenagers. Out of the 500,000 people who participated, nearly 36 percent of the adults and 20 percent of the teenagers admitted to using a tanning bed.

Researchers also examined cancer rates and found that the number of skin cancer cases outweigh the number of lung cancer cases each year. While smoking causes around 363,000 cases of lung cancer annually, there are an estimated 419,000 cases of basal and squamous cell carcinomas. Additionally, there are around 11,000 cases of melanoma that could be linked to the use of tanning beds.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger is passionate about proper sun protection.

As a board certified dermatologist and cosmetic surgeon, Dr. Joel Schlessinger is a strong advocate for practicing healthy skin care. He supports the ban of tanning beds for all minors in hopes that it will save future generations from melanoma and other skin cancers.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger also recommends wearing sunscreen every day, even if you aren’t exposed to direct sunlight. He is especially supportive of the use of sunscreen in schools, where many administrators have banned the use of sun protection for children.  Dr. Joel Schlessinger appeared on the Huffington Post last year to discuss the implications of this ban.

Do you have questions about healthy skin care for Dr. Joel Schlessinger? Share with us in the comments.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger weighs in on the antibacterial soap debate

Wednesday, December 18th, 2013

Dr. Joel Schlessinger weighs in on the antibacterial soap debateIn recent studies performed by the Food and Drug Administration, it is suggested that antibacterial soap may not be more effective than regular soap and water. In addition, many antibacterial soaps could potentially contain harmful ingredients that could outweigh any of the benefits of antibacterial soap.

Board-certified dermatologist and cosmetic surgeon Dr. Joel Schlessinger is wary of antibacterial soaps.

“The problem is that many soaps actually contain antibiotics, which can lead to bacterial resistance,” Dr. Schlessinger said. “This is a very big deal.”

Some studies have found that antibacterial soaps may be contributing to antibiotic resistance, creating a much more powerful and dangerous strain of bacteria.

“This leaves us in a difficult position,” Dr. Schlessinger said. “We have a limited palate of products and germs that aren’t even coming close to being conquered. “

Other cleaning options also have their downfalls, Dr. Joel Schlessinger explains.

“While soap and water remain a reasonable option, the problem with them is the amount of time it takes to result in a thorough cleanse,” said Dr. Joel Schlessinger. “Generally, the rule of thumb is to sing the song ‘Happy Birthday’ twice, but how many individuals will sing that once, let alone twice?”

Other options include alcohol-based gels and sanitizers, but Dr. Joel Schlessinger is hesitant with using only these options for cleansing.

“These products aren’t as broad spectrum as other products,” said Dr. Schlessinger. “They can be very harsh on the skin due to the necessary alcohol content of 70% and they don’t provide coverage against the very important C difficile bacteria.”

Dr. Joel Schlessinger recommends regular soap, water and the CLn family of products.

CLn is a gentle and soothing family of products designed for skin prone to infection.

“CLN, which contains bleach, is one of the few antibacterial agents that doesn’t lead to the worsening of our antibiotic crisis in America,” Dr. Joel Schlessinger explains. “Bleach is a natural antibacterial that leads to eradication of germs and bacteria without the worsening of antibiotic resistance.”

“I am sticking with regular soap and water and CLn for my patients and myself!”

Visit LovelySkin.com today to purchase your CLn products and protect yourself and your family from antibacterial soaps.

Joel Schlessinger MD shares how aging changes our appearance

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Joel Schlessinger MD shares how aging changes our appearance

Everyone ages in their own way. In a recent article on Fstoppers.com titled “10 Incredible GIFs Showing How Aging Changes Our Appearance,” one photographer snapped pictures of men and women to mimic a photo of them 50 to 60 years earlier. Joel Schlessinger MD says the differences between their young and old photos are incredible.

“Clearly, these are some of the most impressive before and after pictures we have ever seen,” he says.

The signs of aging are unpredictable, Joel Schlessinger MD explains.

Fine lines, wrinkles, dark spots and sun damage are just a few things that come with aging. Joel Schlessinger MD says these signs of aging can be delayed by taking care of your skin and seeing a skin care specialist.

“Luckily, many of these changes are completely avoidable with sun protection and little tweaks such as Botox, fillers and Ultherapy,” he says. “Many of these individuals would have been easily treated with these simple options.”

These treatment options have become popular among patients who want to delay fine lines and deep wrinkles.

“The newest paradigm is to completely avoid the advanced aging processes by using Botox and fillers to forestall it,” Joel Schlessinger MD says. “We are fortunate to be living in such an age.”

Joel Schlessinger MD says proper skin care can also keep your complexion looking youthful.

The best way to prevent premature aging and sun damage is to apply a broad spectrum sunscreen every day. Along with proper sun protection, Joel Schlessinger MD recommends finding products that cater to your specific concerns. LovelySkin carries a wide variety of anti-wrinkle treatments, skin brighteners and more.

Do you have a question for Joel Schlessinger MD? Let us know in the comment section.

Joel Schlessinger MD discusses a new study that suggests stress really can make your hair turn gray

Monday, June 24th, 2013

Joel Schlessinger MD discusses a new study that suggests stress really can make your hair turn gray

Can stress really turn your hair gray? Joel Schlessinger MD explains.

A recent study shows that stress may have a link to an increase of graying hair. According to a recent study published in Nature Medicine, the appearance of gray hair could be caused by periods of stress or skin damage. The study’s findings may also lead to new methods of treatment for pigmentation disorders such as vitiligo or piebaldism.

Joel Schlessinger MD shares the science behind this study.

Hair and skin both receive their pigment from melanin, which is produced by melanocytes. These melanocytes are created by stem cells at the base of the hair follicle. When the skin is stressed or damaged, these stem cells migrate to repair damage, leaving the follicle without its own supply of melanocytes. The surprising part of this study is that, contrary to previous findings, the stem cells migrate without replicating first. Without the ability to produce melanin, the hair follicles turn white.

This link could lead to improved treatments for other skin conditions, according to Joel Schlessinger MD.

Gray hair during aging is caused by exhaustion and the loss of melanocyte-producing stem cells. Stress can cause these stem cells to migrate faster, leading to an earlier appearance of gray hair.

Additional research needs to be done, but these new findings could provide a better understanding of skin conditions that have troubled dermatologists for years. More information about how stem cells migrate might even lead to improved treatment of vitiligo (depigmentation of the skin) and hyperpigmentation (an excess of pigment in the skin).

What do you think of these findings? Share with us in the comments.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger warns about the dangers of a chemical found in black henna tattoos

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Dr. Joel Schlessinger warns about the dangers of a chemical found in black henna tattoos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In an article titled “Temporary Tattoos May Put You at Risk,” the FDA recently reported that a chemical found in black henna tattoos could cause allergic reactions.

Traditional henna, which is reddish-brown in color, originates from a flowering plant found in tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, southern Asia and northern Australia. It has been used to dye hair, skin and fingernails for centuries. But black henna is a different story. It may include coal-tar hair dye containing p-phenylenediamine (PPD), an ingredient that can cause dangerous skin reactions in some people.

The side effects of these temporary tattoos can be treated, but permanent scarring is sometimes unavoidable. Dr. Joel Schlessinger explains.

Allergic reactions to black henna can occur immediately after application or as long as two to three weeks later. The FDA has received consumer reports of these temporary tattoos causing blisters, redness, loss of pigmentation, “raised, red weeping lesions” and an increased sensitivity to sunlight.

Dr. Joel Schlessinger says these symptoms are often treated with topical steroids, oral steroids or antihistamines. In some cases, patients with severe allergic reactions can develop permanent scarring.

Avoid temporary tattoos, Dr. Joel Schlessinger says, especially those offered by kiosks found in popular travel destinations.

PPD is banned in cosmetics and the Department of Public Health regulates parlors that provide permanent tattoos, but many states don’t have official standards for temporary tattoos. Without proper regulation, this dangerous chemical has been found in kiosks on beaches, boardwalks and foreign resorts.

One way to avoid these dangerous skin reactions is to consider the product. Traditional henna usually fades within a few days. When kiosks promise darker, longer-lasting temporary tattoos, Dr. Joel Schlessinger says this is a sign they could be using black henna.

The best way to stay safe, he says, is to complete avoid temporary tattoos of any kind.

Have you had a bad experience with temporary tattoos? Let us know in the comments.